Youth Congress Starts ‘Mission Roti’ for Agitating Farmers

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Caption: National President, IYC Srinivas B.V. Making arrangements at the backyard of New Delhi Office

The ryots fear that the three new farm laws will reduce their earnings and give more power to large retailers

 Mohd Aasif | Clarion India

NEW DELHI – On Friday, the youth wing of the Indian National Congress (INC) started ‘Mission Roti’ and also made an arrangement for the stay of hundreds of protesting farmers at the Indian Youth Congress (IYC) office here.

Friday was the second day of the ryots protesting at the border of the national capital against the Centre’s three new farm laws.

Srinivasa B.V, National President of IYC, told Clarion India that the farmers who had succeeded in entering Delhi on Thursday night had spent the night at the office campus.

He also condemned the treatment given to the farmers at the state borders. “Where will they get shelter and food in this chilling winter?. We have made arrangements for food and shelter at our office. Whoever wants to come and stay, they can”, he added.

Members of the Joint Action Committee of Farmers (JACF) and the Panchayati Raj Parishad (PRP) have been coordinating with the IYC to provide food and accommodation to the sons of the soil.

The ryots fear that the three new farm laws will reduce their earnings and give more power to large retailers.

Farmers from six states–Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Uttarakhand, Rajasthan, Kerala and Punjab–have organised a Delhi Chalo march to protest against the Centre’s Bills, which, the government says, are aimed at bringing reforms by doing away with middlemen and improving farmers’ earnings by allowing them to sell their produce in the commercial market, anywhere in the country.

Dheeraj, member of JACF, Haryana Unit, told Clarion India that around 500 farmers were heading towards Delhi and had already  crossed the Tokri border. “There are others, too, coming from different routes.

The ruling Bharatiya Janata Party has made allegations that the protesting farmers had been provoked by the Congress.

However, the farmer leaders find the charge amusing. “On the one hand, they call the Congress a ‘dead’ party, and, at the same time, they blame the protests on the Congress. How is it possible?” wonders Vijay Pandey, General Secretary of PRP, one of the coordinators of the movement.

“Farming is the matter of state governments, and panchayats play a vital role in such matters but panchayats were not taken into confidence before bringing in these Bills”, Pandey added.

Dheeraj said that the Congress was not leading the movement but was giving moral support to the farmers. “It is the movement of farmers alone, not the political parties”, he added.

The Delhi Police allowed the protesting farmers to enter the national capital on Friday afternoon and detained them at a massive ground in Burari locality in Delhi.

“Food packets for 10,000 people will be arranged as a promised support at the Nirankari Sant Samagam Ground in Burari”, Dheeraj told Clarion India.

“The movement is the result of the plight of the farmers. Whoever can understand the problem of peasants will come in support of farmers”, he added, denying the provocative role of the Congress.

“It is nothing but their fear of the Congress. They said the same thing during the anti-CAA-NRC movement”, he further added.

The ryots fear that the three new farm laws will reduce their earnings and give more power to large retailers.

Farmers from six states–Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Uttarakhand, Rajasthan, Kerala and Punjab–are protesting against the Centre’s Bills, which, the government says, are aimed at bringing reforms by doing away with middlemen and improving farmers’ earnings by allowing them to sell their produce in the commercial market, anywhere in the country.

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