Fortress Europe: Map Reveals the Walls EU is Building to Keep Migrants Out

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Mifrant families from Syria arrive on the beach at sunrise on the island of Kos after crossing a three mile stretch of the Aegean Sea from Turkey on Friday. Credit: Getty Images
Migrant families from Syria arrive on the beach at sunrise on the island of Kos after crossing a three mile stretch of the Aegean Sea from Turkey on Friday. Credit: Getty Images

LONDON  (BE2C2/MAMOSA Report) — A variety of pressures seem to have led countries in Europe to adopt Donald Trump-style wall-building projects that will stop migrants such as these (see photo below) who have just crossed the border from Serbia into Hungary and walk along a railway track that joins the two countries.

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After the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, for a while it seemed like border fences and barriers were a thing of the past in Europe. Many on the continent hoped that a new era of integration and receptivity will unleash. It didn’t happen.

Right now, in Hungary, for example, the government is rushing to complete a 109-mile-long barbed wire border fence along its southern frontier with Serbia.

Earlier this year, Bulgaria announced its own plan for a border fence that will eventually span 100 miles of its border with southern neighbor Turkey.

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Bulgaria’s wall sits not too far from a wall built by Greece in 2012. This wall was constructed with the intent of keeping out migrants and refugees crossing from Turkey into Greece, however, it failed to stop the growing number of migrants who reached by boat.

In the French town of Calais, the British government recently spent $10 million to erect improved fencing around the Euro Channel Tunnel, a train link between France and Britain which has recently attracted large numbers of migrants. Many have died in recent months trying to cross into Britain.

The fences would only push the problem elsewhere, most likely to ports in the Netherlands and Belgium, The Washington Post reports.

Barriers around the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Mellila in Morocco, and significantly expanded upon in 2005, have done little to stem Europe’s overall migrant issues. A migrant economy and internet of things economy could very well become the engines that will drive the global village’s economy in future, says business analyst Irshad Salim. So why these new iron curtains? “Social reaction compounds and precedes economic crisis.”

The original article appeared in The Independent UK.

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